Why Use an Integrated Solution for Requirements Management and MBSE?

Systems Engineering and Requirements Management

One of the questions we get most is “Why should we get a tool that does both requirements management and MBSE?” With the growth of SaaS products, we are seeing industries all over using an integrated platform. For example, the crm we use, Hubspot, has taken advantage of the unique capabilities of the SaaS market. Hubspot integrated the entire marketing lifecycle into one place from content management, analytics, email automation, etc. We’ve greatly benefited from using only one tool for all of our marketing efforts. Innoslate provides similar benefits with its integrated platform for the entire product lifecycle including the the process modeling, risk analysis, and testing.

A lot of times, we hear people tell us that they “only do the requirements management or the process modeling part of the lifecycle,” therefore they don’t need an integrated platform. Think about what’s your overall goal when you are capturing, managing, and analyzing requirements? You are certainly not just doing this entire process because you enjoy paperwork. You’re goal in requirements management is to meet the goals and needs of stakeholders to complete a product or process. For instance, to create medical devices, large networks, or develop an autonomous vehicle. Let’s keep using the autonomous vehicle example. You’ve done your research, you have 1000s and 1000s of high quality requirements. The document has a complete layout including roadside infrastructure, vehicle safety, DOT regulations, vehicle communication, etc. You know exactly what you are building. The next step is the how you are going to build it.  Whether or not you are the one that does the ‘how,’ at some point in this system or product both parts will have to be completed. Even if the requirements team is handing the project off to another team for analysis and testing, it’s still best to only use one tool. If you don’t, you’ll wind up spending a long time transfering and organizing data. Unfortunately, you’ll probably lose some data in that process, which will result in not having full traceability. With a tool like Innoslate you can develop requirements then create the process of how you will build it.


Long story short…There are a lot of reasons you should integrate requirements management with model-based systems engineering.


Here’s seven to start with.


Saves the entire company time

This is especially true for large organizations. Software tools require training and management. If you have two different tools, you have to do double the training. IT has to spend time managing both tools. It’s even worse if you are putting the software on a server, then IT have to manage two servers. If you want api integration between software, they are probably the ones that have to set that up too. You and your team will lose weeks of time importing and exporting data between tools.  

Saves money

One tool costs much less than two. Innoslate costs much less than most requirements management tools and mbse tools. It’s certainly less than having to buy both. You also don’t have to pay for any additional plugins to make the tools work with each other.


Time is money. You are going to save a lot of money by not wasting employee’s time importing all that data into another tool or having IT manage two servers and force integration.


Keeps your data all in one place

Besides saving lots of time and stress, keeping your data in one place also reduces risk. You can easily lose data (and not even realize it) during the import/export process. Every tool has a different underlying schema, which can make it extremely challenging to import all the data exactly as the requirements manager intended. This can result in a loss of traceability and make the requirements manager look bad. With using one tool you can easily trace requirements, actions, documents, test processes and more to each other. Innoslate allows you to create relationships from almost anywhere making it simple to create full traceability through the entire project.



Many times requirements managers and engineers struggle to communicate. We just pass our requirements onto the engineers to let them do the next steps. No one wants this to occur. We want both sides to effectively communicate, so they can create a lessons learned. Using two different tools just makes this entire process harder. Innoslate provides version control, chat, comment, and more to make collaborating with diverse teams easy. So next time the engineers want to give the requirements team feedback, they can use the same Innoslate project.


Document the Requirements Management Process

What better way to create a requirements management process then to use the advanced built-in models in a MBSE tool? In Innoslate you can model the entire requirements management process. From there you can trace back each action to the requirements or any document. You can also use the collaboration features to make the process a workflow. This way team members will receive email notifications when it’s their turn to do the next step or when something has been approved.


Develop requirements from models

If you use a tool that integrates both requirements management and MBSE, you can actually develop low level requirements from the models. The beauty in creating requirements from models is it allows you to analyze the current process and the future process and from that you can understand what you need. This is especially great if you are starting a requirements document from scratch. Innoslate has a built-in feature that automatically creates requirements documents directly from your models. Here’s a great article that shows you how: “Developing Requirements from Models – How and Why?”


Gain Valuable Insight

Applying MBSE to requirements management gives you valuable insight you wouldn’t be able to have otherwise. Creating executable models allows you to use the monte carlo simulator, so that you can calculate the variance in cost, time, and resources.Without even leaving the program you can trace back to the requirements document to see if the proposed process meets the specified cost, time, and resources specified in the requirements.


Save your organization a whole lot of time, money, and stress by using an integrated solution for a project’s lifecycle. Having the requirements management, modeling, and testing all in one easy to access place will make everyone’s life easier. If you would like to try an integrated requirements management and MBSE solution, sign up for Innoslate at innoslate.com/sign-up.

Ford vs. Mazda Transmissions: Why Does Quality Matter?

In the 1980’s Ford owned roughly 25% of Mazda (then known as Toyo Koygo). Ford had Mazda manufacture some automatic transmissions for cars sold in the United States. Both Ford and Mazda were building the same transmission off of the same specification and both had 100% specification conformance. However, the Ford transmissions were receiving more customer complaints about noise and were having higher warranty repair costs. This led Ford engineers to investigate and they found that the Ford manufactured transmissions utilized 70% of the available tolerance spread for manufactured parts, while Mazda used only 27% (AC 2012-4265: Promoting Awareness in Manufacturing Students of Key Concepts of Lean Design to Improve Manufacturing Quality). The Ford engineers began to realize that the Mazda transmissions were higher quality than the Ford manufactured ones. It turned out that Mazda was using a slightly more expensive grinding process than what Ford was using. This raised Mazda’s manufacturing costs, however the full lifetime costs were higher for the Ford manufactured transmissions.

This story is a prime example of why it is important to think about quality. Too often we tend to focus on other metrics and neglect quality, or we use a single metric to define quality. Ford experienced this by focusing on a “Zero Defect” policy, thinking that if there were zero defect in a transmission that would produce a quality transmission. Mazda expanded on this policy and took the whole lifecycle cost and experience into consideration as they developed their transmissions. With this holistic view, it is easy to see why engineers need to think about quality all across a program’s lifecycle.

Building Quality into The Lifecycle

If the goal of an organization is to deliver a quality product, engineers at all stages need to think about how they can add quality into the system. An easy way to think about how to add quality, is ask yourself: “What are the extra details, the extra effort, the extra care that can be put into the product?” When these extra efforts are applied to a properly defined system, the output is often a quality system. To a program manager all the extra effort sounds like a fair amount of extra cost. This is true, however it is important to weigh the short term cost increase against the potential long term costs savings. Below are two examples of how to add quality in the lifecycle.


One of the first steps of the design effort is requirement building and unfortunately having a requirement like “system shall be of a quality design” does not cut it. Never mind that this requirement violates nearly all the good requirement rules, it fails to take into account the characteristics of a quality system. Is it the “spare no expense” engineering efforts of high end audio systems or is it the good quality for the price factor of Japanese manufactured cars in the 1970s? It is important to identify how the customer and market defines quality. Having this understanding informs choices going forward and prevents a scenario where the market doesn’t value the added quality efforts.


The procurement/manufacturing phase of the lifecycle is where quality efforts are the most visible. As parts are being ordered it is important to be thinking about how the whole supply chain thinks about quality. This involves reviewing the supplier’s suppliers to verify that the parts being delivered do not have a poor design or a possible defect that could be hidden through integration. For internally manufactured parts, is extra effort being added to check that the solder on pins is clean and will not short other sections under heating? Extra thought and care should be given to the human interface of the system, as this normally plays a major role in determining the quality of a system. For software, do user interfaces make sense, do they flow, are they visually appealing? These are the kinds of questions that should be asked to help guild engineers to building a quality system.

 “Quality Is Our Top Priority”

All too often I find a Scott Adams’ Dilbert comic strip that highlights a common problem that engineers face. In the comic below we have a perfect example of Pointy-Haired Boss directing Dilbert, Alice, and Wally to focus on quality.


DILBERT from Sunday March 28, 2004


What Pointy-Haired Boss fails to realize is that quality and the rest of his priorities are not mutually exclusive and can be done concurrently. A quality system is one that is safe, that is law abiding, and is financially viable. Quality should also be added to these factors, making sure that the extra bit of design work is worthwhile. All of these factors when properly combined together with good design and engineering produce a quality system.

By Daniel Hettema. Reposted from the SPEC Innovations’ blog with permission.

How to Best Migrate Your Data to Innoslate

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Leaving your old tool might seem daunting, but Innoslate is a modern, cloud-computing tool that makes moving your data simple. Here are a few simple step to make migrating your data to Innoslate easy.


#1 Organize Your Data

Assess how much data you really want to move into a Innoslate. It’s just like moving from your home. Get rid of the stuff you don’t need and only move the really valuable items. You may find there is very little data that needs to be moved into a new tool. This is true of existing, long term projects, as well as new ones. By getting rid of the clutter, you can improve your practice significantly.


#2 Extend the Schema to Meet Your Needs

During step #1, you’ll want to make note of your project’s schema. Make sure that Innoslate can accept the schema changes you’ve made and easily import the data from a CSV file or other format. See how to make changes to the schema here: https://help.innoslate.com/users-guide/database/schema/ Innoslate offers  


#3 Check Your Data’s File Types

Innoslate’s Import Analyzer can accept many different file types. The Import Analyzer provides drag and drop import capability for .csv, .docx, .xml files. There is also an advanced importer for .xmi, .pdf, and .txt files. Innoslate already has built-in analytics to replace their functionality or at least has an open Software Development Kit (SDK)/Applications Programmer Interfaces (API) that allows you to replicate that functionality. If you were previously using modeling tools, you should use one that has XMI or some other capability to read files exported from your existing tool. Note that since you may be coming from what is essentially a drawing tool into a data-driven tool, you may have to redraw some of the diagrams. That’s really an opportunity to make sure that the diagrams do not contain errors. You can test the results of your models to ensure accuracy using the Discrete Event simulator.


#4 Archive Your Data

After you have imported all of your data into Innoslate, create a copy of your project. This is a great safety measure. You can save your data here.


#5 Baseline All Your Documents

Then make sure to baseline all the data that you originally imported into Innoslate.  https://help.innoslate.com/users-guide/documents/requirements/baselining/ Baselining allows you to create You can create copies of your original project.


#6 Need Help, Ask For It

With the new software as a service (SaaS) model, support is part of the package and not an additional charge. Use that support to help you in this move. Think of them as movers you have already paid for. Contact support at support@innoslate.com.

If you want to learn more about innoslate, request or free trial or contact us. If you want to see a tool that has all these features and provides the support you need, then check out Innoslate® at www.innoslate.com.

Welcome to the Innoslate Blog

Welcome to the new Innoslate blog! This blog will give us a unique opportunity to share news, updates and systems engineering community content. An archive of our previous content is available here: https://www.specinnovations.com/blog/

If you are new to Innoslate, Innoslate is a modern full-lifecycle systems engineering tool. This cloud or on-premise web application was made specifically for systems engineers by systems engineers.

We will be updating this Blog on a regular basis to keep you in touch with our latest news and events. Take a moment to explore the content already posted.

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