Quick Guide to Innoslate’s Ontology

Innoslate uses the Lifecycle Modeling Language (LML) ontology as the basis for the tool’s database schema. For those new to the word “ontology,” it’s simply the set of classes and relationships between them that form the basis for capturing the information needed. We look at this in a simple Entity-Relationship-Attribute (ERA) form. This formulation has a simple parallel to the way we look at most languages: entities represent nouns; relationships represent verbs; attributes on the entity represent adjectives; and attributes on relationships represent adverbs.

LML contains twelve (12) entity classes and eight (8) subclasses. They represent the basic elements of information needed to describe almost any system. The figure below shows how they can be grouped to create the models needed for this description.

Most of these entity classes have various ways to visualize the information, which are commonly called models or diagrams. The benefit of producing the visualizations using this ontology means that when you create one model, other models that use the same information will automatically have that information available.

All these entities are linked to one another through the relationships. The primary relationships are shown below.

 

This language takes a little getting used to, like any other language. For example, you might be used to referring to something functional as a Function or Activity. These are both “types” of Actions in LML and implemented as labels in Innoslate. Similarly, you may be used to using different relationship names for parents and children for different entity classes. However, by using the same verbs for the parent-child relationships you can avoid confusion in having to remember all the different verbs.

You still might need other ontological additions. LML was meant to be the “80% solution.” You should look very closely at the ontology, as often you only need to add types (labels) or an attribute here and there. Hopefully, you will rarely need to add new classes and relationships. If you do add new classes, try to do so as subclasses to existing ones, so that you inherit the diagrams as well. For example, when the Innoslate development team added the new Test Center, they decided they needed to extend the Action class. This enables the TestCase class to inherit the Action class and other functional diagrams, as well as the status, duration, and other attributes that were important.

Hopefully, you can see the benefits of using LML as the basis for Innoslate’s schema. It was designed to be:

  • Broad (covers the entire lifecycle – technical and programmatic)
  • Ontology-based (enables translation from LML to other languages and back)
  • All the capabilities of SysML (with LML v1.1 extensions) and DoDAF
  • Simple structure
  • Useful for stakeholders across the entire lifecycle

For more information, see www.lifeyclemodeling.org and visit the Help Center at help.innoslate.com.